Safe and Dangerous Places in San Francisco

by K. Chang, an AOL Travel ContributorPosted Aug 16th 2010 01:04 PM

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Areas to Avoid San Francisco

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San Francisco is an odd city. The worst parts of the town are just blocks away from the most touristy parts. Most tourists have a problem telling the neighborhoods apart, and the seedier areas are not exactly marked on a map. Furthermore, the character of a neighborhood can change from day to night. There are some areas you should avoid in San Francisco.

Here are the five safest and the five most dangerous areas in San Francisco, from a local resident to help you get the best out of your time in the "City by the Bay."

Safest areas


Union Square is center of the "downtown" area, surrounded by shops, restaurants, and hotels catering to tourists. The Powell street cable-car line runs from Market Street all the way to Fisherman's Wharf. This area has a lot of people, so violent crimes are rare. Park inside a public garage (the rates can be high) and you should have no problem other than encountering pickpockets. It's just a bit... touristy, and it is right next to Tenderloin, one of the seediest parts of town. Don't go past Taylor Street, and don't veer off Geary / O'Farrell streets, and you should be fine.


Another touristy-spot of San Francisco Fisherman's Wharf is crowded enough well into dusk to be safe enough to walk about, and there are plenty of public transit and shops and whatnot to keep you busy. It also has attractions like museums, rides, and the famous Bay Cruise and ferries to Alcatraz. However, it also attracts pickpockets and occasional auto break-ins. Lock up the GPS in the glove box (and wipe the suction-cup marks off the windshield).


Chinatown / North Beach / Nob Hill / Financial District: These areas are all so close together that I count them together. North Beach is little Italy, which is right next to Chinatown. Nob Hill was the richest part of town on top of the hill next to Chinatown, and the Financial District is all the office buildings "below" Chinatown, including the famous Transamerica Pyramid. This area is always busy during the day, and very safe. Barbary Coast, which is right next to Chinatown / North Beach, may be an exception, as it is full of clubs and some adult entertainment.


The Richmond neighborhood (Geary and Clement streets), basically anything north of Golden Gate Park, is mostly residential, but some streets are known for commercial stuff as well. There are a few big-box stores, but mostly smaller restaurants. Geary Street from Arguello toward the west has restaurants in almost every block until you are near Ocean Beach. One block to the north, Clement Street from Third Avenue on is known as "Second Chinatown." It is a bit out of the way, but also very busy and safe, full of locals.


Japantown is a bit out of the way for most tourists, but is easily reached via Geary Street from downtown (take the 38 bus) west of downtown. The Peace Plaza and the Kinokuniya mall (with its collection of Japanese and Korean restaurants, shops, curios, and more) are a welcome change of pace from the VERY touristy spots of San Francisco. Or walk north a bit to California Street and see the residential side of San Francisco.


Areas to avoid


The Tenderloin is named because the police who were assigned to patrol this area gets an extra stipend, allowing them to buy better meat (tenderloin) for their meals. It is one of the seediest parts of town, mere blocks from the downtown Union Square area. Consider the Hilton Hotel on O'Farrell as the western boundary; do not go past Taylor Street. The area is relatively harmless during the day, but gets downright scary at night.

South of Market is very quiet, especially at night, except around certain bars and clubs Friday and Saturday nights. There have been occasional shootings outside clubs. You probably won't want to be in this area if you are drunk, especially when you can't remember a number to call for taxi (415-333-3333 for Yellow Cab). During the day, you can find some factory outlet stores in the area, and they are worth visiting if you don't want to go far out of town for bargains.

Market Street is a major thoroughfare, but the area between Fifth and 10th streets is much seedier than the downtown section (Embarcadero to Fifth Street). There are quite a few closed shops (full of graffiti), adult movie places, and more. Also, United Nations Plaza and some nooks and crannies around the area are full of homeless folks who may be panhandling (begging) for spare change. Most are harmless, but some may be more aggressive / persistent. This area is somewhat intimidating for tourists during the day, and downright scary at night due to bad lighting. You might definitely want to avoid this area in San Francisco.

Golden Gate Park is very dark at night, and visitors are NOT welcome. There is nothing to see at night anyway. Golden Gate Park is also known for some renegade homeless campers, and is one of the few San Francisco crime hotspots. Visit during the day. You'll see much more, such as the California Academy of Science and the Conservatory of Flowers. If you search a bit, you'll also find Queen Wilhelmina's Tulip Garden, and some genuine Dutch windmills.

The Mission District is fine during the day. However, at night the character of the place changes. Certain northern parts of northern Mission are known for, uh... solicitations. Also, most shops close at night and nobody walks the streets except near some nightclubs. Recently a man was mugged and stabbed while walking in Dolores Park in the early morning. Avoid when it's too quiet.

Final tips from a resident


There is no "San Francisco Style." People here wear just about anything, from T-shirts to dress shirts. Just don't look TOO much like a tourist... gawking and camera around your neck or hung from a strap to your hand. Try not to wear one of those waist wallets either. It screams "tourist."

Simply ignore all panhandlers and walk past them. Most will not continue to bother you. Some will pretend they are selling a newspaper.

Get the Muni passport, so you can take public transit around the city. Parking is very difficult in the city. Buses are generally very safe, though somewhat slow, and can be crowded during commute hours on certain lines. Buy a "transit map" or "transit guide" at the Visitor's Center at Market and Powell streets and plan your routes.

Enjoy your stay in San Francisco.

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Sebastian Fenton

Thanks.This was really helpful. I've now returned from my trip to "The City by the Bay" and loved it. It's funny reading comments made about the safe and not-so-safe places and say to myself, "Yes, I've been there," and can identify what the K. Chang meant.

August 20 2014 at 6:32 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Sebastian Fenton

this

August 20 2014 at 6:27 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
wolfbanetini

SOMA (South Of Market) and from Fifth Street and on towards Outer Mission is not safe at night. Usual crimes are theft, and of course harassment, but yes you can get shot at or stabbed/hit if you are in the crossfire or anger a homeless junkie. Unless you live in bad neighbourhood and not a snob/preferably very poor and known to all the locals, you can be targeted. During the day in the Mission street area, 20th, 25th and such, WATCH YOUR MONEY. There are people that will brush against you/distract you on the bus and another person will steal your wallet. It MIGHT happen, happened to me after I lived in SF for 13 years haha! Just stay alert. There are gang fights on Mission, it happens sometimes, just be aware, trust me, regular Mexican families don't like gang activity either. Be friendly, but walk with purpose if somebody harasses you. Do not let anyone touch or brush against you, just maneuver, stay aware of your belongings. O'Farrell street from Van Ness and down is very seedy, gang activity and dealing, around strip joints, we lived there on practically homeless status, in a hostel, and noone bothered me, because I was friendly and openly poor, and we lived right over a Century strip club, always talked with dealers and homeless and always were polite/didn't treat them like crap. I'm a typical target, tiny, disabled, sickly, always absorbed in my own thoughts, foreign, etc. but I was treated with respect and even compassion by the dealers and the homeless, treated them like people and they treated us like people, but tourists get mugged there on a regular basis. And also: don't be visibly scared. Stay confident, if someone is soliciting/asking for something or homeless cuss at you/demand money, and they are not insane, I (while keep walking) usually said that we are broke, I'm sick, dude, I'm sorry, we were homeless too. If a belligerent person follows you, do not talk to them, stay aware, walk faster, do not discuss this person with your companions until out of earshot. Often very stuck up, drunk, rude, yuppie types from out of town get mugged on principle, so be serious and not condescending, nice, but do not stop for conversations, If need to get away confidently say "no". My husband and I are very, very poor, and couldn't often spare a dime, but he sometimes got a little food for the homeless guys we lived around, shared a cigarette. It helped.

April 04 2014 at 11:30 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
ac

Thank you for the tips! Much appreciated from a tourist taking his family up to SF this Christmas.

December 08 2013 at 10:35 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Steele Salvatore-.

hello! I wonder how are the socio-economic neighborhoods in San Francisco ... Wich ones are the difficult areas, of millionaire people, etc?

June 19 2013 at 4:44 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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